Nothing Is Ever Finished

"So one never forgets anything, one never goes forward and forward, you are always moving in a circular way, and nothing is ever finished, nothing is ever finished until you leave.” - Philip Guston

1,259 notes

thedemon-hauntedworld:

NGC 300

Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys shows individual stars, clusters of stars and nebulae in the spiral galaxy NGC 300, located approximately 7 million light-years away from Earth. The image shows a star-forming region a few thousand light-years farther from the galaxy’s centre. The yellow nebulosities are the glow from hot gas that has been heated by radiation from the nearest young, blue stars. The image at far right reveals more diffuse groupings of young, blue stars, farther away from the galaxy’s centre, along with faint shells of hot gas.

Credit: NASA, ESA, J. Dalcanton and B. Williams (University of Washington)

(via n-a-s-a)

Filed under space deep space nature science hubble stars nebula nasa

239 notes

distant-traveller:

Persistent Saturnian auroras

Are Saturn’s auroras like Earth’s? To help answer this question, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Cassini spacecraft monitored Saturn’s South Pole simultaneously as Cassini closed in on the gas giant in January 2004. Hubble snapped images in ultraviolet light, while Cassini recorded radio emissions and monitored the solar wind. Like on Earth, Saturn’s auroras make total or partial rings around magnetic poles. Unlike on Earth, however, Saturn’s auroras persist for days, as opposed to only minutes on Earth. Although surely created by charged particles entering the atmosphere, Saturn’s auroras also appear to be more closely modulated by the solar wind than either Earth’s or Jupiter’s auroras. The above sequence shows three Hubble images of Saturn each taken two days apart.

Image credit: J. Clarke (Boston U.) & Z. Levay (STScI), ESA, NASA

distant-traveller:

Persistent Saturnian auroras

Are Saturn’s auroras like Earth’s? To help answer this question, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Cassini spacecraft monitored Saturn’s South Pole simultaneously as Cassini closed in on the gas giant in January 2004. Hubble snapped images in ultraviolet light, while Cassini recorded radio emissions and monitored the solar wind. Like on Earth, Saturn’s auroras make total or partial rings around magnetic poles. Unlike on Earth, however, Saturn’s auroras persist for days, as opposed to only minutes on Earth. Although surely created by charged particles entering the atmosphere, Saturn’s auroras also appear to be more closely modulated by the solar wind than either Earth’s or Jupiter’s auroras. The above sequence shows three Hubble images of Saturn each taken two days apart.

Image credit: J. Clarke (Boston U.) & Z. Levay (STScI), ESA, NASA

(Source: apod.nasa.gov, via ruckawriter)

Filed under space nature science solar system saturn aurora borealis hubble cassini

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mosaicrecords:

Jimmy Witherspoon with Ben Webster

Jimmy Witherspoon and Ben Webster’s quartet taped this Jazz Casual show in San Francisco in the early ‘60s. This performance of “T’Ain’t Nobody’s Biz-ness” is a lesson in pacing and in the blues. They unfold this classic song in a slow, measured tempo, and build in dynamics and drama as they move along in their own unhurried way.

-Michael Cuscuna

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Filed under sex music blues jazz on tv jimmy witherspoon ben webster blues shouter kansas city jazz

496 notes

ohstarstuff:

New Horizons Zooms Past Neptune on 25th Anniversary of Voyager 2
25 years ago today Voyager 2 made the only close approach to Neptune, coming within 3,000 miles of the blue gas giant. At the time of the flyby, the spacecraft captured this incredible image of the planet’s southern hemisphere. Two dark spots are visible: an Earth-sized Great Dark Spot located on the far left, and Dark Spot 2 located near bottom. A bright cloud dubbed “Scooter” accompanies the Great Dark Spot. Recent computer simulations indicate that scooters are methane clouds that might commonly be found near dark spots.
In what one NASA official dubbed as a “cosmic coincidence”, the New Horizons spacecraft passed through Neptune’s orbit today on its way to its intended destination of Pluto. Launched in 2006, New Horizons is the fastest spacecraft ever launched and will be the first probe to reach Pluto. Little is known about the dwarf planet. It’s so dim and far away that the best photos by NASA’s powerful Hubble Space Telescope show Pluto as a blur of pixels. It is scheduled to arrive at Pluto on July 14, 2015 and many incredible discoveries await. READ MORE

ohstarstuff:

New Horizons Zooms Past Neptune on 25th Anniversary of Voyager 2


25 years ago today Voyager 2 made the only close approach to Neptune, coming within 3,000 miles of the blue gas giant. At the time of the flyby, the spacecraft captured this incredible image of the planet’s southern hemisphere. Two dark spots are visible: an Earth-sized Great Dark Spot located on the far left, and Dark Spot 2 located near bottom. A bright cloud dubbed “Scooter” accompanies the Great Dark Spot. Recent computer simulations indicate that scooters are methane clouds that might commonly be found near dark spots.

In what one NASA official dubbed as a “cosmic coincidence”, the New Horizons spacecraft passed through Neptune’s orbit today on its way to its intended destination of Pluto. Launched in 2006, New Horizons is the fastest spacecraft ever launched and will be the first probe to reach Pluto. Little is known about the dwarf planet. It’s so dim and far away that the best photos by NASA’s powerful Hubble Space Telescope show Pluto as a blur of pixels. It is scheduled to arrive at Pluto on July 14, 2015 and many incredible discoveries await.

READ MORE

Filed under science nature space solar system neptune voyager 2